How to design in-store promotional displays

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FEW THINGS ARE BETTER AT GETTING CUSTOMER ATTENTION THAN IN-STORE PROMOTIONAL DISPLAYS BUT DESIGNING THEM CAN BE DIFFICULT IF YOU WANT THEM TO BE EFFECTIVE.

When it comes to in-store retail, one of the most important aspects of brands is getting consumers to spot your products. Marketing can be extremely difficult when shelves are full of competition for the attention of customers. Most consumers will make a decision on-the-spot as to what to buy, which is where promotional displays come in.

By utilising an in-store display, you can focus consumer attention away from other products and directly onto yours. However, it’s not as simple as just placing your items away from their competition. You need to make sure that your display is eye-catching and provides customers with a compelling reason to make a purchase.

Retailers have around a second per consumer to captivate their attention, so how do you go about doing that? The first thing you need to consider when designing an in-store promotional display is therefore arguably the simplest: making sure it’s eye-catching in a retail environment.

 

BE MEMORABLE

Bear in mind your consumers are likely to be bombarded by different colours and brand names in an average store, so it isn’t enough to rely on visuals alone, although they undoubtedly play a big part. If you can use an unusual design of display to grab people’s attention, you need to be able to follow it up with something more substantial. 

The best way to do this is to create something that your customers will immediately recognise as relevant to their needs and interests. Think about all the Christmas-themed displays that are unveiled in stores throughout December; brands know that people will be shopping for presents and planning Christmas dinner, so appealing to this is an easy way to make their displays relevant. 

CONNECT WITH CUSTOMERS

To work out how to make your displays connect with consumers, think about what your product means to people. If you are selling something to do with cleaning, for example, you might want to consider that customers don’t enjoy the activity associated with your product. 

It makes sense, therefore, to sell it based on how convenient it is and how it will shorten the time they need to spend using it. A good display might therefore be based around words like ‘quick’ and ‘easy’, showcasing visuals that immediately suggest convenience.  

If you’ve grabbed a consumer’s attention, you then need to be able to quickly convey why they should buy your product. Your display can’t contain an essay on the advantages of making a purchase, so emphasise one or two benefits in a simple manner. Remember, consumers are likely to make most of their purchasing decisions on the spot, so if you can highlight a unique advantage your product has, that might be enough.

TELL A STORY 

How you convey this information is more important than the details of what you’re trying to get across.  

Use your display to tell a story visually wherever possible, relying on images rather than words to get your points across. Think of a customer seeing your display from the other end of an aisle; will they be able to understand what your product does without getting close enough to read the words? 

MIX IT UP! 

Don’t be afraid to use different shapes and structures for your promotional displays. Certain images are immediately recognisable and can associate your product with a particular emotion. For example, going back to the Christmas example, items like stockings and Christmas trees immediately associate your product with the holiday from a distance. 

Don’t be afraid to go the extra mile, either. Some brands have used lights, sounds, movement and even smells to create displays that evoke an emotion, grab consumer attention and showcase what the product is about in as few words as possible. Think about what you want, then work out whether it’s possible. 

SUMMARY  

  • Don’t be afraid to design outside of the box and create something unexpected. As long as you keep it relevant to your customers, you are on to a winner. 
  • Get your message across with concise wording. 
  • Weave a story into your displays that customers will connect with.  
  • Think how shapes from your brand identity can be integrated into your retail design. Don’t forget to experiment with light and sound too. 

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